Latest from NESMA

Since the fall of 2017, much has been written about the issue of sexual harassment in the workplace.

And a rise in awareness of the problem has clearly led to a rise in the number of harassment claims being filed against employers.

Is all this news changing the way employers are training and managing their employees?

A research effort sampling U.S. human resource managers in March of this year produced these findings:

  • 79 percent of HR professionals said that sexual harassment prevention training will be considered a “high priority” or “essential” moving forward, up from 40 percent prior to the 2017 news coverage.
  • 84 percent of HR professionals said that how the company handles sexual harassment complaints will be considered a “high priority” or “essential” moving forward, up from 65 percent.

But is change really occurring?  Read more.